[Menvi-discuss] blind musicians with perfect pitch

Chris Cooke ccooke228 at gmail.com
Mon Sep 18 08:32:22 EDT 2017


I have really been enjoying this thread on perfect pitch. One thing that's really difficult for me, is playing on the keyboard when someone has hit the key transpose. Because a "see" the keys in my mind when I play, it really messes me up when I think one pitch and hear another. That being said, my perfect pitch has been a blessing throughout my life. I love to be able to transcribe things that I hear in the key in which they were written. It also helps out in so many other ways. Thanks for a great discussion!
Chris Cooke


Music of the heart
Worshiping God
Bringing musicians together
www.Playhymns.com

> On Sep 17, 2017, at 9:30 AM, Jared Rimer - MENVI webmaster via Menvi-discuss <menvi-discuss at menvi.org> wrote:
> 
> Chris,
> 
> I think I would have the same reaction as you when asked to sing it in a different key than the one its supposed to be in.  It'd take me a bit to figure that one out too.  That was a great chuckle.  Thanks for sharing.
> 
> Jared Rimer
> Music Education Network for the Visually Impaired
> www.menvi.org
> bridging the gap between the blind and music education
> 
> When reporting broken links, please kindly let us know what web page you came from so we may fix the error as quickly as possible. Thanks!
> 
> On 9/17/2017 7:47 AM, Chris Smart via Menvi-discuss wrote:
>>> Perfect pitch, although useful, I think is overrated. and, that's from someone who definitely has it. I can hum or sing any note, without a reference, very accurately, and name things very quickly upon hearing them.  In fact, when attending live jazz concerts, I wish I could turn that part of my brain off, and hear the music more how others do. In other words, I wish I could stop naming every chord as it goes by, every note, and be affected more on an emotional level.
>> It used to give me real problems when, in sight singing class, our teacher would say something like "ok, let's sing example 4, but transposed up a third. Whaaaat? My brain has real trouble trying to read, say, C E G, but sing F A C.  For this reason, I try to learn tunes in several keys now, so I'm not as reliant on my pitch memory.
>> As a friend of mine likes to say, whenever the subject of learning by ear comes up: absolute pitch just gets you the first note. Relative pitch can get you every note after that.
>> Chris
>> ----------------------------------------
>> "There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer
>> ---------
>> Thank you for subscribing to MENVI.  Should you wish to unsubscribe, change your delivery, or set any other options available to you, please view the list information page below.  Should you have any questions, please contact the owner of the list.
>> _______________________________________________
>> Menvi-discuss mailing list
>> Menvi-discuss at menvi.org
>> http://menvi.org/mailman/listinfo/menvi-discuss_menvi.org
> 
> ---------
> 
> Thank you for subscribing to MENVI.  Should you wish to unsubscribe, change your delivery, or set any other options available to you, please view the list information page below.  Should you have any questions, please contact the owner of the list.
> _______________________________________________
> Menvi-discuss mailing list
> Menvi-discuss at menvi.org
> http://menvi.org/mailman/listinfo/menvi-discuss_menvi.org




More information about the Menvi-discuss mailing list