[Menvi-discuss] piano methods

STEPHANIE PIECK themusicsuite at verizon.net
Mon May 6 08:12:31 EDT 2013


I did it so long ago that I don't remember. But if you e-mail an inquiry to 
RNIB, someone there should be able to tell you.

Stephanie Pieck
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Stephanie" <sim.musicschool at gmail.com>
To: "This is for discussing music and braille literacy" 
<menvi-discuss at menvi.org>
Sent: Sunday, May 05, 2013 9:38 PM
Subject: Re: [Menvi-discuss] piano methods


> How do I join?
> Steph
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "STEPHANIE PIECK" <themusicsuite at verizon.net
> To: "This is for discussing music and braille 
> literacy"<menvi-discuss at menvi.org
> Date sent: Sun, 05 May 2013 07:54:01 -0400
> Subject: Re: [Menvi-discuss] piano methods
>
> Anyone in any country can join the National Library for the Blind 
> (England),
> and then you can borrow any of the books in their collection.  I've done 
> this
> with old ABRSM books and am exploring what titles they have for books 
> about
> piano pedagogy.
>
> Stephanie Pieck
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Stephanie" <sim.musicschool at gmail.com
> To: "This is for discussing music and braille literacy"
> <menvi-discuss at menvi.org
> Sent: Saturday, May 04, 2013 11:43 PM
> Subject: Re: [Menvi-discuss] piano methods
>
>
> Thank you so much.  I will look in to these.  I live in Australia, so not
> sure how much i can tap in to these.
> I'd like to build my music colection before starting to teach full time.
> Steph
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "STEPHANIE PIECK" <themusicsuite at verizon.net
> To: "This is for discussing music and braille
> literacy"<menvi-discuss at menvi.org
> Date sent: Sat, 04 May 2013 11:18:26 -0400
> Subject: Re: [Menvi-discuss] piano methods
>
> Hi,
>
> American Printing House for the Blind sells the complete Alfred Basic
> course
> (Levels 1A, 1B, and 2 through 6).  They're expensive, but this is still
> one
> of the most widely-used method series in the U.S., both for kids and
> adults.
>
> Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB) has the Oxford Piano Course
> (Piano Time, books 1 through 3; Piano Time Pieces, books 1 and 2; Duets
> with
> a Difference for ensemble work; and Tunes for Ten Fingers, More Tunes for
> Ten Fingers, and Fun for Ten Fingers--all by Pauline Hall).  The "Ten
> Fingers" books are really good for very young beginners because they
> introduce musical notation reading using middle C as the starting point
> for
> both right and left hands and working outword.  This makes it easier for
> players with very small hands to play; it also fosters stronger
> note-recognition earlier in students than the usual C Major 5-finger
> approach does because it encourages reading by relationships, not through
> memorizing isolated note positions on the bass or treble staff.
>
> Another excellent (and fun) series is Christopher Norton's "American
> Popular
> Piano Repertoire" series.  The Library of Congress has the Preparatory
> Level
> and Levels 1 through 8 available for download, and Prima Vista Braille
> Music
> Services sells all these plus Levels 9 and 10.  I like these both as
> supplementary material and as sight-reading practice for my sighted
> students.
>
> For general repertoire collections, one of the best comprehensive series
> is
> Denes Agay's "Classics to Moderns".  There are four volumes: "Easy
> Classics
> to Moderns, Volume 17", "More Easy Classics to Moderns, Volume 27",
> "Classics to Moderns for the Early Intermediate Grades, Volume 37", and
> "Classics to Moderns, Volume 47".  All can be borrowed and some can be
> downloaded from the Library of Congress.  These books offer a very wide
> variety of pieces spanning from early Baroque (Jerimiah Clarke, the Bachs,
> Handel, and many French composers such as Rameau, Dandrieu, etc.) through
> early 20th-century ones (Stravinsky, Bartok, Villa-Lobos).
>
> The Bastien "Piano Literature" series in four volumes is also still widely
> used and while it has a much smaller sampling than the Agay books, it
> contains the most popular "old standbies" of classical music teaching:
> "Fur
> Elise", Elmenreich's "Spinning Song", (both in Volume Three), Mozart's
> Sonata K.  545 and various Bach two-part inventions and Chopin preludes
> (Volume Four).  Apparently, the publisher of this series has produced a
> Volume Five and Volume Six, but neither of these are available yet in
> Braille.
>
> If you're unable to purchase music from RNIB, you can join their National
> Library for the Blind and borrow titles.  This makes it possible to access
> any of the graded exam pieces from the Associated Board of the Royal
> Schools
> of Music--which for some reason can't be bought by anyone outside the
> United
> Kingdom.  These books offer a wide variety of styles and periods at each
> grade level (1 through 8), and also give blind teachers an opportunity to
> have access to some of the more modern arrangements and compositions.  For
> example, the 2013-2014 Grade 2 book includes a nice easy jazz piece called
> "Strange Things Happen" by Sarah Watts; a great arrangement of "Meet the
> Flintstones!"; and pieces by Thomas Attwood, Matthyas Seiber, Handel and
> others.  Further up the difficulty ladder, at Grade 5, the 2013-2014 book
> includes "For Lydia" by Darius Brubeck, MacDowell's "To a Wild Rose", and
> others.
>
> The Suzuki Piano School books (Volumes 1 through 7), available through the
> Library of Congress, are good sources for many of the "standard
> repertoire"
> pieces, too.  I have heard from sighted colleagues who use the Suzuki
> books
> that they have been revised many times over the years, so I'm not sure how
> the Braille would correspond to what's being published now.
>
> The Alfred "Sonata Album" (Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven), and Scarlatti's
> "Sixty Sonatas" are both available for download from the Library of
> Congress
> and are fixtures in any good teaching collection.
>
> The "Piano Adventures" series is really popular, but as yet, I'm not sure
> if
> it's available in its entirety, although Prima Vista was working on it.
> The
> concepts in it are well-presented, but they're done in highly visual ways
> so
> I'm not sure if this would be an easy book to use for a Braille reader
> working with sighted beginners.
>
> Finally, while not used as much these days, some teachers still rely on
> the
> following books:
> Bastien "Piano Lessons" books--Primer and Levels 1 through 4.  If you end
> up
> using these and want to make sure your students have matching print
> equivalents, be sure that you ask your print music retailer for the "old
> edition"--i.e., not revised or updated.  I haven't used these in a long
> time
> because I didn't like the constant use of chord symbols--students ended up
> cheating and just reading those instead of learning to read bass clef
> notation!
> John Thompson's "Modern Course for the Piano", beginning with Teaching
> Little Fingers to Play and continuing from First to Fifth Grade books--the
> constant use of finger numbers infuriated me, but these can all be
> borrowed
> from Library of Congress.
>
> Hope that helps you get started ...
>
> Stephanie Pieck
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Stephanie" <sim.musicschool at gmail.com
> To: "This is for discussing music and braille literacy"
> <menvi-discuss at menvi.org
> Sent: Saturday, May 04, 2013 8:40 AM
> Subject: [Menvi-discuss] piano methods
>
>
> Hi all,
> I am just begining to start my teaching studio and looking for piano
> methods to use.  I'd like to buy one for use at home, and if possible have
> a complete one, not the first few books.  Any help would be fantastic!
> Thanks,
> Steph
>
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